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Night Passage

14 Jan

Two brothers, one an outlaw and the other a former railroad troubleshooter in disgrace, square off. That’s the basic premise of  Night Passage.

Jimmy Stewart is the honest man who is now reduced to scratching out a living as an accordion player after letting his no-good sibling Audie Murphy escape five years previously. He gets a last chance to redeem himself when his ex-boss hires him again. The railroad payroll has been repeatedly robbed by a gang of outlaws led by The Utica Kid (Murphy) and Whitey Harbin (Dan Duryea) – Stewart is assigned to see that the next one gets through. So the stage is set for a showdown.

Night Passage

 Night Passage is the Anthony Mann western that never was. Mann was slated to direct Jimmy Stewart once again but pulled out at the last minute. His replacement was James Neilson (a debut director) and he managed to produce a serviceable movie, but fails to properly use the edgy quality that Mann always seemed to extract from his lead.

There are a number of weaknesses present, not least the overuse of Stewart’s accordian playing! The plot tries to pack in too many ideas and never really develops any of them sufficiently; Murphy and Stewart’s battle for the soul of Brandon De Wilde could have been expanded upon. It is shown early on that Stewart’s old flame is now married to his boss, but again nothing much is made of this.

Nevertheless, there are lots of good things here. The cinematography of William H. Daniels shows off the Colorado scenery to breathtaking effect in some beautiful shots and Dimitri Tiomkin provides one of his great trademark scores. I’ve heard it said that his music is sometimes too overpowering and in-your-face but I can’t think of any examples of his work that I didn’t like. Murphy is good in the role of the black sheep; he always seemed to give better performances when playing anti-heroic characters (No Name on the Bullet and John Huston’s The Unforgiven come to mind). There’s also a fine array of familiar support players in Jay C. Flippen, Jack Elam, Olive Carey, Hugh Beaumont and Paul Fix.

The film is available on DVD from Universal and looks very nice indeed in anamorphic scope – I have the R2 but I imagine the R1 uses the same transfer. Recommended.

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9 Comments

Posted by on January 14, 2008 in 1950s, Audie Murphy, Dan Duryea, James Stewart, Westerns

 

9 responses to “Night Passage

  1. ruxy walsh

    January 15, 2008 at 5:39 am

    Bring back the western!!!! hooray for Robert Duvall who has been in two recently. We need the good guys who do what’s right because it is right.
    Love Audie Murphy, a true hero. Wish they would show more than the same ones on TV.

     
  2. livius

    January 15, 2008 at 10:29 am

    I’m guessing that you’re referring to ‘Broken Trail’ as one of those Robert Duvall westerns. If so, it is an excellent piece of work from Walter Hill with some fantastic photography.

    As for the Western returning, it has made a small comeback of late with ‘Seraphim Falls’, the ’3.10 to Yuma’ remake and ‘The Assassination of Jesse James’. I too would like to see more on TV, DVD and in the cinema.

     
  3. Ian W

    January 15, 2008 at 4:00 pm

    I’d love to have seen what Mann would have done with this. As it is ‘serviceable’ is a pretty good description of what we got. Neilson lacked the experience and was essentially a TV director. It’s one of Murphy’s best though, behind No Name on the Bullet, and I think the actor enjoyed the chance to break away from playing squeaky clean heroes.

    Sadly I can’t see the western making a comeback. Much as I enjoyed both Seraphim Falls and 3:10 to Yuma neither set the box office alight.

     
  4. livius

    January 15, 2008 at 10:27 pm

    True, I don’t think any of the recent westerns were box office dynamite but nor did they bomb totally. So I live in hope.
    I got to see ‘The Assassination of Jesse James’ last weekend in downtown Athens, where it’s just opened, and I was pleased to note that it played to a full and appreciative house.

     
  5. le0pard13

    April 12, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    Agreed. An Anthony Mann western that I wish had stayed in his hands. Alas, not meant to be. Fine look at this one, Colin.

    p.s., IIRC, the conflict behind this picture led to the falling out with James Stewart, the result being the two never worked together again.

     
    • Colin

      April 12, 2013 at 8:17 pm

      Michael, you might want to have a look at Toby’s site where there was a terrific discussion prompted by his post on the movie here. And then again when he reviewed the film in detail here.

       
  6. Ron Scheer (@rdscheer)

    April 12, 2013 at 11:02 pm

    I found this western kind of a shambles, not much really working well together, plausible, or well developed. I agree with the commenter who wanted to see what Mann would have done with the script.

     
    • Colin

      April 13, 2013 at 3:49 am

      I think those sentiments are shared by many. In the past I tended to be fairly lukewarm myself, although watching the film again back at the beginning of the year saw me concentrating more on the positive aspects.
      I guess that we’re all curious how Mann would have handled the movie, but the fact remains that it has to be judged on its own merits. As such, the beautiful cinematography and the lighter, more relaxed performance by Stewart are worthwhile elements.

       

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