Blu News – Blood on the Moon

A welcome bit of news just came to my attention so I thought it might be nice to pass it on here. Robert Wise’s noir-tinged western Blood on the Moon (which I wrote about here a good few years ago) has been announced as coming from the Warner Archive in April. From the Warner Archive Facebook page:

New 2020 1080p master from 4K scan of original camera negative!
BLOOD ON THE MOON (1948)
Run Time 93:00
Subtitles English SDH
Audio Specs MONO – English, DTS HD-Master Audio 2.0 – English
Aspect Ratio 1.37:1, 4 X 3 FULL FRAME
Product Color BLACK & WHITE
Disc Configuration BD 50
Extra Content: Theatrical Trailer (SD)

Director Robert Wise is at the helm as Robert Mitchum, Robert Preston, and Barbara Bel Geddes star in this taut Western thriller about a gunslinging drifter who realizes he’s been hired to be a villain. Out on the Texas frontier, Jim Garry (Mitchum) rides into town, quickly getting caught in a simmering confrontation between homesteaders and cattle ranchers. After accepting employment from an old mercenary friend, Tate Riling (Preston), Garry comes to realize that Riling has been manipulating the tensions between rancher John Lufton (Tom Tully) and the local settlers in a bid to swindle the Luftons out of their livestock. Garry becomes torn between his conscience and his greed until he finds himself falling for John Lufton’s daughter, the formidable Amy (Bel Geddes). Soon, the two old friends will face off in a bloody showdown from which only one will leave alive. Based on the novel Gunman’s Chance by Luke Short.

89 thoughts on “Blu News – Blood on the Moon

  1. Colin

    ‘Blood on the Moon” is one of those rare films that for me, fires on all cylinders. Both the cast and crew do wonderful work. I always wonder why this does not make many top western film lists. It deserves to be.

    Gord

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Have seen this on TV years ago and loved it so will get the Blu as soon as I can. I think this is the role that led Walter Brennan to say something like Mitchum was the most genuine cowboy he ever saw on screen.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Colin, that is such a fine review you wrote. And the responses from your regular responders were, as usual, a pleasure to read. Your site is a continual delight and I can read and re-read the reviews and comments endlessly. That will be a great resource as we start bunkering down here in Australia.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. A very fine, perhaps underrated, western that I rate very highly. Mitchum made a few very good westerns and I think this was the finest. The WA BluRay should look terrific.

    Yes, I hope all our friends out there are doing well and staying safe in this difficult time. We wait to see how bad things will get in the UK. Not ‘locked in’ yet but if we are then this is where a good collection of great films to watch will ease the inconvenience!

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  4. Jerry

    The minus 22 C weather here is keeping me indoors and glued to the television. Two films I took in ihe last few days are the noir, REPEAT PERFORMANCE- 1947 and THE KILLER IS LOOSE – 1957. The first was once thought to be a lost film. A quite watchable film in my humble opinion. The second title was a film by western favorite, director, Budd Boetticher. This is also a watchable film.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’ve seen the Boetticher film and thought it was fine with Corey, Fleming and Cotten all well cast.
      I’ve not had a chance to see Repeat Performance yet though.

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  5. Colin
    Took a look at your DARK MIRROR write-up from 2011. Again, as I have said before, you have a real talent for placing films in the right spot rating wise. Olivia de Havilland as you say shines, and for me, Thomas Mitchell is the glue that binds the whole production together.

    Gordon

    Liked by 1 person

    • Gordon and Colin,

      We all agree on those films, “THE DARK MIRROR” especially. I attended a Robert Siodmak retrospective at The National Film Theatre in London in the 1970s and was introduced to that great film-maker in fine style over several evenings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I feel Siodmak, along with Lang, played a hugely significant role in shaping what we now think of as classic film noir though the 1940s. A remarkable run of movies.

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    • Isn’t it though! I get more of a kick out of hearing about films like this getting what we might term the deluxe treatment than I do when it’s one of the more obvious choices.

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        • Agreed. That’s nearly always the case with these Archive releases though, isn’t it? I suppose it’s a balancing act the company has to engage in to keep these, let’s face it, pretty much niche titles economically viable.

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            • Actually, Olive did release Pursued on Blu-ray in the US. However, that was years ago and I’d say the movie was ripe for a redo. It’s the kind of thing I’d have though Eureka might like to have a crack at.

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                • I wasn’t sure either and had to have a look at the Beaver’s site as I had a hunch I’d seen a review there at one time. In fairness to both of us, it has been almost 8 years (!) since that came out so it’s hardly unreasonable for it to have slipped our minds.

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                  • Lucky you’re still razor sharp after all these years! Incidentally, while Region A locked, the Shout release of Wise’s (co) debut, CURSE OF THE CAT PEOPLE, looks beautiful and the commentaries do largely cover who shot what.

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • Unfortunately, I’m locked into Region B (and just generally locked in in every way these Days:( ) but that’s a beguiling movie. I watched my old DVD of it over the Christmas break and was drawn in by its fairy tale charm all over again.

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                    • I’m supposed to start some online work from Monday afternoon, but I have no idea how it’s going to go – that’s only for one of the three centers where I work though. For now, the others haven’t explored that possibility. We’ll see. Generally, I’m not at all happy with this situation – there’s not much except supermarkets, pharmacies and small stores still allowed to operate here as of today – and I’m really not sure where we’re headed with all this.

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  6. All
    Everything is slowly shutting down here. Sports, schools, concerts and likely the movie houses next. At least I have a stockpile of films to go through. First up is RIDE THE PINK HORSE 1947 followed by SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR 1948, DAY OF THE BAD MAN 1958 and STORM FEAR 1956. Plus some guilty pleasures like THE WALKING DEAD.

    Have a good rest of the weekend.

    Gordon,

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Just reflecting on Robert Mitchum. When growing up in the 50’s and 60’s, I viewed many Mitchum movies that aired on TV. I almost always thought, ‘Here is just another Mitchum movie to sit through’. I never really appreciated him as a serious actor and felt he was miscast, except when he played the despicable role in CAPE FEAR where he certainly was not miscast. For many years, when I thought of Mitchum, I thought of that role in CAPE FEAR. However, in later years I grew to appreciate Robert Mitchum and nearly all his movies. He is one of very few actors that could be very convincing and successful by just being himself. Outside of John Wayne, I would be hard pressed to think of another.

    Liked by 1 person

    • His was a very naturalistic approach, Scott. I do think his self-effacing attitude to his art – and art is exactly what it was – led to his being widely undervalued for a long time,

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  8. On the interesting topic of naturalism in acting, I’ve just read a quote from John Ford in 1964, discussing natural actors. He said: “Wayne, Cooper and Gable are what you call natural actors. They are the same off the screen as they are playing a part. Stewart isn’t like that. He isn’t a thing like he is on the screen. Stewart did a whale of a job manufacturing a character the public went for. He studied acting.” In my view, both types of actors could bring great power to their roles and inhabit different types of characters. Think John Wayne in The Searchers or Stewart in any of the Mann movies.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You wrote this while I was writing mine. I hadn’t seen that quote from Ford (that I remember). I bow to Ford on his own direction of actors more than on this differentiation that he makes. Everyone is natural and convincing in his films. Some characters in his films are more theatrical so he casts actors that have that naturally in their personality–an actor like John Carradine is a good example of that–and they come over beautifully.

      James Stewart is cast in a more intense emotional key for someone like Mann than some of the actors we value, but to me he is just as believable and I’d say natural within who those characters are. He is very cable of moderating that too. He also is my top tier–the more challenging the role the better for him too, and he will find himself in it. He and Mann were a godsend to each other, obviously.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Since he is one my half dozen favorite actors in American cinema, I’m inclined to add this thought. Movie acting has its own qualities and is not just like stage acting. The camera has an effect on it–and Mitchum is one of the most gifted at knowing how much emotion the camera will pick up and how much he himself much register. What is considered his underplaying (in most of his films, and those where I find him at his peak) is his understanding of this–it really is superb acting. Movies like THE LUSTY MEN, THE WONDERFUL COUNTRY, HOME FROM THE HILL, OUT OF THE PAST, PURSUED…
    (BLOOD ON THE MOON fits in here) ,a movie like RYAN’S DAUGHTER where he was unexpectedly cast and entirely convincing.

    Of course, if more flamboyance is called for (THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER, CAPE FEAR…) he obviously can deliver that quite brilliantly, starting from the usual understatement and building up to the theatrics with that as a base. These are still part of that same special gift as I have experienced it.

    I don’t think any actor plays himself (or herself). If they convince us that they are, that just shows how good they are. Because in movies, being believable in the role is everything and showy acting is, well, not as much. Those who most love actors “acting up a storm” as it were will say “Don’t just stand there. Act.” But so often I’m more likely to feel “Don’t just act. Stand there.”

    So I prize Mitchum, Wayne and could go on from there to others like that.
    And won’t strike a negative note by naming others who win awards and are horrendously overrated but we all know who they are.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. What was initially a bit of a nothing post has taken a pretty interesting turn, hasn’t it? And of course that is why I appreciate the contributions of all you who drop by and comment here – the place would be meaningless without your input.
    I think I’d have to disagree with Ford to some extent here. My own view of naturalism in acting is, rather like Blake alluded to above, dependent on how much the performer draws me into their characterization. I don’t feel it’s so much about playing themselves as it is about appearing to do so, that is being credible enough in the role as to give the impression of not really acting at all. I mean, I have no idea what James Stewart was like in real life but I’m willing to buy into the different personas he created on screen, to believe in the characters.

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  11. James Stewart is also one of my 5 favourite screen actors, in any genre. He could be intense, emotional, laid back, funny and anything between – but always believable. A fine actor and, by any account I have read or seen him interviewed, a thoroughly decent man.
    One of my favourites of his many fine performances is in 1959’s “ANATOMY OF A MURDER”. That’s without even mentioning his Mann westerns.

    Robert Mitchum underplayed so well that he was underrated in many ways, I think. Anybody seen him as an Aussie sheep farmer in 1960’s “THE SUNDOWNERS” alongside Deborah Kerr? Wonderful natural performances from both of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. “I don’t feel it’s so much about playing themselves as it is about appearing to do so, that is being credible enough in the role as to give the impression of not really acting at all.”

    That expresses with perfect clarity what I had wanted to say. You said it better than I did, Colin.

    Someone here probably knows IN HARM’S WAY (Preminger, 1965). There is a scene (done in one long take) where John Wayne’s character has to depart a ship after being relieved of his command. That’s all the scene is, his descending some steps among the men and walking off. He doesn’t seem to be doing anything special, no apparent drama, yet you feel so much about the man through that shot and it deepens your empathy for him. Magnificent acting by Wayne and plainly appreciated by Preminger, who visualizes it perfectly and means it to register as it does..

    I heard Mitchum say that he especially liked playing with Deborah Kerr, among all actresses, and wished he’d been in more movies with her. They did have tremendous chemistry, which lifted those two movies. Of course, as she was playing in nun in HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON that made it even more erotically charged.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Terrific insights, Blake and Colin. You have me really trying to think through the meaning of ‘natural’ acting.

      I took the Ford quote as a slight to the natural actors, meaning all they could do was project on film the kind of personality they were off screen. They didn’t have the skill and artistry to inhabit different types of characters.

      I don’t think Ford is correct. (Apparently it was terrifying to differ with him in person). The character Wayne inhabits in The Searchers – bitter, obsessed – is so different from the avuncular persona in Rio Bravo, for example. And his “big” acting in True Grit is quite different again. By the way, I love all three of those movies and Wayne’s performance is a big part of their appeal to me.

      The Randolph Scott persona was very similar in the great Boetticher films. So you could say on that basis that he was of limited acting skill, not able to display convincingly a wide range of characters. But then I can’t think of anyone who could have better played those parts for Boetticher.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. There are a couple of Mitchum films i’m looking for. THE ANGRY HILL’s 1959 with Mitch and Stanley Baker. A WW2 film set in 1941 Greece. Saw it once in about 1980 and have never come across it since. It was directed by Robert Aldrich. Next would be the IRA movie, THE NIGHT FIGHTERS from 1960. It has Richard Harris and Cyril Cusack in the cast. Directed by Tay Garnett. Never seen this one.,

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve not seen either one myself, but I understand there are DVDs of both available in Europe – perhaps Spain or Italy, but I can’t remember where exactly just at the moment.

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  14. Jerry, Western2017, Colin and all.

    Speaking of THE SUNDOWNERS (wonderful film) I got to see one of the actors from that film live on stage here in Calgary. 4-5 years before he passed, Peter Ustinov was here doing a one show. He just sat on stage and told the audience stories of his life and work, It was wonderful. This was the second of these one man shows I had seen. Several years earlier, Gregory Peck had been in town doing the same kind of show. That was also great.

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  15. How great to see those two on stage! Both were consummate actors and would have provided great entertainment. My best effort with seeing movie stars on stage was to see Kristin Scott Thomas and Bob Hoskins in a play in London. Sadly, neither ever made it to star in a Western. I did see Bill Nighy on the street in Melbourne a few years ago. No Westerns for him so far, either.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Colin
    Lifting your comment from up the page a bit. (What was initially a bit of a nothing post has taken a pretty interesting turn, hasn’t it? And of course that is why I appreciate the contributions of all you who drop by and comment here – the place would be meaningless without your input.) I’m sure everyone here loves that your site is up. There are fewer sites it seems where one can have a friendly discourse with like minded people about westerns, noir and directors and so on. Thanks for the site!
    Gordon

    Liked by 1 person

  17. It’s interesting that we have had some discussion of actors in movies we admire because of the death of Stuart Whitman (1928-2020) which I read about today. (You can easily find obituaries by googling, but I none I read did a lot to capture him.)

    So just a brief nod here to Whitman because I did like him so much, and he had a definite place in Westerns and beginning in the era that means the most to most of here. Coming up, he was in SILVER LODE (1954, Allan Dwan), nice part of as one Dan Duryea’s men, and a bit in SEVEN MEN FROM NOW (1956, Budd Boetticher) too. But best parts were later on when he was second lead or lead and he got some really good roles.

    THE COMANCHEROS (1961, Michael Curtiz, that director’s last movie) seems to get mentioned more but although his role alongside John Wayne was a good one, it isn’t the best of this Westerns) .

    I feel it’s THESE THOUSAND HILLS (1959; Richard Fleischer) where Whitman played Don Murray’s errant but sympathetic best friend–in a terrific cast which also included Richard Egan and Patricia Owens, Whitman was one of the two standouts along with the brilliant Lee Remick, who was also just getting established then. I don’t know why this Western has never come up to the reputation I believe it deserves (though I know I’m not its only fan). I’ve always found it one of the most satisfying in the genre even though it was pretty adult for the age I was when I came out, and have written about it and always proselytize about it as I am now. It has aged well, is so beautifully realized, has all the iconography of classical Westerns that we love but not in the most familiar way, and an individual treatment of the themes of redemption and renewal that mean a lot to Colin, for one, as they do to me. If you’re looking for something to see Whitman in and have never seen it, I’d recommend seeking this out both for him and for the film.

    The other Western that is especially good for me is RIO CONCHOS (1964; Gordon Douglas) where Whitman is one of the leads, and provides good counterpoint to the Richard Boone as the more volatile character. Colin has written about this and I’d encourage him providing the link (I don’t know how to simply put “here” or would do it) because it was a really good piece and there was some good discussion. Of Westerns in that transitional 1963-1966 period where classical and modernist visions for the Westerns kind of co-existed, it had something of both worlds in equal balance and I believe was one of the best Westerns of those years partly for that reason.

    Stuart Whitman had the looks to be a certain kind of rugged type and be cast a certain way, and that happens a lot and not only with him of course, but the range of his gifts went beyond the type, evident in his roles in those Westerns, so it’s not a surprise that he did so well in unexpected casting in THE MARK (1961; Guy Green), even to getting an Academy Award nomination for a relatively low profile movie that was pretty compelling drama.

    Well, guess that’s enough appreciation from me. RIP, Stuart Whitman.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Got up early as is best time for shopping here (maybe most places) and so my proofreading suffered a little from fatigue (obviously), so apologies and it should all be readable. But I will make one correct–Patricia Owens is her right name of course.

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      • That’s a lovely nod to Stuart Whitman, Blake. When I heard of his death, I immediately thought of him in his small role in Seven Men From Now. On the strength of your recommendation, I’m off now to track down a copy of These Thousand Hills.

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      • Yes, me too. I have seen “THESE THOUSAND HILLS” but so long ago I remember nothing of it. Your recommendation, Blake, is good enough for me. Assuming Amazon are delivering (in doubt) at present, I will try to seek it out.

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  19. I ordered a movie from Amazon Sunday and tracking says it is on its way.

    Of course things can change with this–and everything else.

    It’s kind of good to have a lot of unwatched movies on hand right now!

    Jerry and Steve, as I so value your thoughts on any Westerns, love to read what you’d say about THESE THOUSAND HILLS when you do see it.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I suspect Don Murray did not have box office appeal. When Manhunt aka From Hell To Texas was released earlier, the promoters were aggressively advertising this as “in the tradition of Stagecoach, High Nòon and Shane” but it was not a success. These Thousand Hills was overlooked and Don Murray lost it appeal thereafter. Subsequent movies like One Foot In Hell, Tunnel 28, The Viking Queen etc. did not fare well. Best regards.

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    • Whatever box office appeal Don Murray may or may not have had, it does not matter in the long haul of film history, does it? He was an excellent actor, and carried these films effectively. FROM HELL TO TEXAS also is outstanding, another very beautiful and moving late 50s Western. A few years ago, there was a screening of a new 35 print of that movie and Murray showed up for it and was very likable talking about it.

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  21. I much appreciate your kind words, Blake. I will enjoy putting my thoughts up regarding “THESE THOUSAND HILLS” once I get it and have watched it. (Plenty of time to do that right now).
    I am extremely grateful to have a good movie collection during this horrible crisis.

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  22. Jerry
    Same here as to having a decent backlog of films to watch. Took in Robert Siodmak’s THE CRIMSON PIRATE last night. been at least a couple of decades since last viewed. Fun from one end to the other. First time I noticed Christopher Lee had a bit part. Also noticed that the second unit director on CRIMSON PIRATE was Vernon Sewell. Sewell of course helmed quite a few UK crime etc films like SPIN A DARK WEB, STRONGROOM, RADIO CAB MURDER, URGE TO KILL and personal favorite, THE MAN IN THE BACK SEAT.
    Gordon

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    • Gordon,

      We clearly like a lot of the same films. Vernon Sewell is a name I am always happy to see against a film. I have all those films you mention, except “MAN IN THE BACK SEAT” which so far has eluded me. His first feature “THE SILVER FLEET” is a good one. Most of his films are minor fare but that is just fine with me.
      I will hope that Back Seat will get shown sometime here on the wonderful TV channel Talking Pictures TV that we are so blessed to have in the UK.
      Been a rainy day here so I just finished watching “GARDEN OF EVIL” which I had not seen in years. Coop was excellent in it, great music by Bernard Herrmann, fabulous scenic vistas (Mexico) and a director with a solid grasp, Henry Hathaway.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jerry, The Man in the Back Seat can be found as a bonus movie with Volume 5 of Network’s Edgar Wallace Mysteries, and it is indeed a terrific slice of low budget suspense featuring the same two leads as Strongroom.

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  23. Jerry
    One of my cable channels is going to show IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY, BRIGHTON ROCK, RIFIFI, RED RIVER, DETOUR, NIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH, THE BLACK BOOK, MR. SARDNICUS, THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF, THE GLASS KEY,DEADLINE USA,PANIC IN THE STREETS,APPOINTMENT WITH DANGER,COMANCHE, PATHS OF GLORY and a couple of MA AND PA KETTLE comedy types over the next two weeks. The cable box will be buzzing recording all those titles. Talk with you later. Gord

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    • That’s a terrific line-up, Gord! Many Jerry-favourites in there too, especially “BRIGHTON ROCK” (which I re-watched over last weekend and loved all over again) and “IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY”, which could just be the best British-made ‘noir’. It is a special favourite of mine (and John K’s too, I know!).

      That lot will keep you out of mischief LOL!!

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  24. Better late than never…….
    First, there’s some sensational news that Kino have announced a triple Universal Noir set. on Blu Ray. At least two of the films have at various times been
    discussed at some length here at RTHC. The two in question are THE SLEEPING CITY, ABANDONED. The third title in the set is THE LADY GAMBLES which I have never seen. The first two are from RTHC faves George Sherman and Joseph M Newman and both are grade A Noirs,in my opinion, at least.
    THE LADY GAMBLES is from Michael Gordon a director who in the latter part of his career seemed to mainly be involved with what I like to call lightweight fluff. His earlier credits are interesting though with SECRET OF CONVICT LAKE probably being the best known among RTHC followers. Gordon also made some interesting B’s for Columbia and some better known Universal Noirs like WOMAN ON THE RUN and THE WEB. The writing credits on THE LADY GAMBLES are stellar: Roy Huggins,Halstead Welles.
    Someone on Kino’s Facebook page has asked if these films will be available as single units and the answer is NO! In a somewhat display of arrogance Kino say that their usual Blu Ray’s retail at $30 and the set will cost $50…as they say “you do the maths” All well and good but the pound has now sunk to a 35 year low, hard times indeed for UK film collectors. Still when all is said and done it’s fine to see such little known films getting high def remasters.
    Colin – I was bemused/intrigued by your “Wholehearted Emotional Engagement” comment over at Margot’s. I just had to chip in on that one buddy and I hope that the good intentions that I had meant to convey are evident in my lengthy reply.

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    • Well, that is an interesting announcement, and thanks for passing it on, John. I have good standard definition copies of two of those movies but not of Abandoned, a title I’ve long wanted to see. Like yourself though, I don’t like that price tag, although the fact Kino Blu-rays are region locked rules a purchase out for me anyway. That said, the fact the masters for these are available means there is a chance of them popping up elsewhere at some stage.
      Michael Gordon did indeed make some interesting movies. The Web badly needs a release of some form and I watched and enjoyed Woman in Hiding some time ago and The Secret of Convict Lake is a superior little western made just before the blacklist stalled his career.

      Yes John, I saw and very much enjoyed your reply over at Margot’s site – she wrote a typically excellent piece on Anthony Mann’s Raw Deal here that I recommend people read. The only thing I’d take issue with in your contribution is your strong dislike of Man of the West – I still think there’s a real power in that picture.

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      • Yes Colin, we have discussed MAN OF THE WEST before – I still can enjoy it for the craft of the film alone and to be honest I cannot really dislike any Mann Western. I still think the film should have starred Robert Taylor and Burl Ives and even I have to admit that the film is a visual treat in high definition.
        I think we all, or at least most of us, have films where our heroes let us down-as much as I adore Eastwood and Siegel I just cannot abide TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA.

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        • Strangely enough, I really liked Two mules for Sister Sara when I first saw it years ago, and while I’m still broadly OK with it as a bit of light entertainment I did notice it fell quite flat for me last time I happened to see it.

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  25. I will not comment on the aforementioned THESE THOUSAND HILLS as to do so will involve spoilers except to say I was unhappy with what happened to the Lee Remick character..that’s all I’ll say for now. It’s a very attractive looking film and I wish Richard Fleischer had made more Westerns.

    It seems that the Universal deal with Kino means that they get to release on Blu Ray films that were previously out on DVD. As we have all mentioned so many times before, there are still so many fine Universal Noirs that have not even had a DVD release. Colin – I hope the pound has recovered somewhat when the Kino
    Noir set is released but in these uncertain times,who knows.
    Colin, I was very taken by your comment on Indicator’s unappealing latest release slate – it would be wonderful if films like ABANDONED and THE SLEEPING CITY were on their radar.

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    • John, are you referring to a comment I made on Indicator’s Facebook page regarding those upcoming titles? If so, I thought the official reply I received from them was extraordinarily priggish and self-important, but whatever. My gut feeling is that the label sees itself as increasingly catering for a certain corner of the market whose interests only occasionally coincide with mine. I could be entirely wrong here but I doubt those Universal crime/noir pictures represent the direction they’re headed in.

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  26. To be honest Colin,the fact that many of their issued long ago titles have not yet sold out and the fact that they on a regular basis have bargain
    basement sales makes me wonder what kind of a market there is for many of the titles that they release. The late lamented Twilight Time had many titles that regularly sold out quick and Indicator have done their own versions of many TT releases. I’m also amazed that some of their earlier Hammer Box Sets are still available.
    Oh! those happy days of the strong pound when I could afford to splash out on TT releases especially when it reached heights of 1.75 against the $ now the poor old £ is spluttering at around 1.15.
    Backtracking…interesting comment regarding Michael Gordon’s blacklisting…never knew that. Also interesting to see MR SARDONICUS on Gordon’s watch list,
    funnily enough I gave the film another look the other night and really enjoyed it Gothic Horror William Castle style – certainly not as we know it but pretty diverting all the same!

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        • William Castle’s films, especially his best known horror movies, are generally good fun. Something I’ve derived great pleasure from in recent years is gradually catching up on how much stuff, and in such a range of genres, he made.

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          • Colin

            Castle was a reasonably talented director who always got what he needed out his cast and crew. My fav Castle film is “Johnny Stool Pigeon” (1949) A well crafted film noir with fine work from Howard Duff, Shelly Winters,, Dan Duryea, John McIntire and an early bit by Tony Curtis. It is another of those Universal- International titles that is difficult to find. (Though, as it so happens, I have a nice print of it)
            Gord

            Liked by 1 person

  27. Am enjoying reading these wide ranging, knowledgeable comments: has made for an entertaining start to the day here. Buying movies from overseas sources has become much more expensive lately. When I was in the UK in mid 2017, the Aussie dollar:was worth 58 UK pence. It’s now 48. Mind you, there were years in the 1990s when it was no more than 40.

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  28. Folks
    If you are looking for some decent looking UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL titles. Go to youtube and type in, East of Sumatra 1953. Then scroll down to Universal Video. There are a bunch of 50’s U-I titles including at least 3 Budd Boetticher titles. There is also a bunch of Tony Curtis and Rock Hudson stuff like SON OF ALI BABA, FORBIDDEN, BLACK SHIELD OF FALWORTH, SEMINOLE etc. I just stumbled on it will looking for something else. Hope it works for everyone.

    Gord

    Liked by 1 person

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